WRITING PROMPTS

Use the gallery to prompt some adventurous writing. Don't forget your structure!

29: Nile Lechwe Motherly Instincts

29: Nile Lechwe Motherly Instincts

Nile Lechwe females typically give birth to a single offspring between November and January. She hides the baby in a protected area away from the herd for two weeks. Nile Lechwe is not the only species whose females hide their young. Explain what motherly instincts are. Why do you think a mother would hide its young in the wild?

28: Gemsbok, Compare and Contrast

28: Gemsbok, Compare and Contrast

Here are photos that show a baby Gemsbok and a mature Gemsbok. What physical characteristics do these Gemsbok share? How are they different? How do you think the mature Gemsbok’s physical characteristics help it to survive in the wild?

27: Wildebeest Perspectives

27: Wildebeest Perspectives

Each year in the wild, up to 500,000 Wildebeest calves are born. Generally, all Wildebeest calves are born around February. They learn to walk within minutes of birth. Within days, they are able to keep up with the herd. How is this different from a human’s developmental timeline? How is a Wildebeest calf’s experience different from a fully-grown Wildebeest’s experience in their Great Migration?

26: Critically Endangered Addax

26: Critically Endangered Addax

Did you know Addax (pictured) are critically endangered? The wild population of this species is estimated to be 30-90 remaining individuals. What do you think causes such a severe decline of a species? Do you think there is one or multiple contributing factors? What is/are it/they?​

25: Giraffes Are Vulnerable

25: Giraffes Are Vulnerable

Did you know Giraffes are vulnerable to endangerment/extinction? What factors might cause a species to become endangered or extinct? What role do organizations like Save The Giraffes or International Rhino Foundation play in saving them?

24: Antler Velvet

24: Antler Velvet

You can see the velvet hanging off this Fallow's antlers. He has already begun to lose his velvet.Knowing the antlers’ velvet is comprised of blood vessels, what role do you think it plays in the antlers’ growth? (Consider the blood, oxygen and nutrients required for antlers to grow and the fact that the blood-vessel-packed velvet deliver those directly for growth.)

23: Waterbuck

23: Waterbuck

One of the Waterbuck’s physical characteristics that makes it easy to identify is the white circle pattern on both males’ and females’ rumps. Some scientists believe in a theory that the circle helps these animals to identify each other and stay together or follow each other. Do you believe this theory? Why or why not?

22: Ratite Feathers

22: Ratite Feathers

How are the plume feathers ratites have different from feathers of birds of flight? How do you think this physical feature affects the bird’s ability to run, and why might running be important for these animals in the wild?

21: Aoudad

21: Aoudad

The Aoudad is closely related to both goats and sheep. However, the Aoudad is neither a goat or a sheep. Even though it is sometimes referred to as a Barbary Sheep, it is its own category of animal. As the photo suggests, Aoudad love to climb. They are native to the northern regions of Africa, which offers a dry, rough, barren, and waterless habitat in mountainous or rocky country. What physical characteristics does this animal have to support itself and survive in that environment?

20: Texas Longhorn

20: Texas Longhorn

When the Spanish and English came to America, they brought cattle with them from their respective countries. Those cattle became feral or wild across Mexico and Texas, and produced what we know today as the Texas Longhorn. What physical characteristics does the Longhorn have? Why is this breed of cattle special to Texas? What does that mean to you?

19: Ostrich Eyelids

19: Ostrich Eyelids

Ostriches are native to different regions in Africa. One of its primary habitats is a Savanna, which could be described as a combination of tropical and desert grassland. In this photo, you can see the Ostrich’s nictitating membrane, which is one of three eyelids. Based on the environment the Ostriches live in, why do you think they would have three eyelids, and what would the eyelids be used for?

18: Conservation

18: Conservation

Natural Bridge Wildlife Ranch works to provide a healthy and sound environment for the animals that call our sanctuary “home.” We strive to ensure the survival and reproduction of more than 45 diverse species from around the world for future generations to enjoy. Name some species of wildlife you know, and give an explanation for what conservation is. Why is conservation important? What role does a place like NBWR play in worldwide conservation?

17: Wildebeests On The Move

17: Wildebeests On The Move

Each year, toward the end of spring or beginning of summer, more than one million Wildebeests and other animals begin an annual migration. What reason(s) can you think of for why these animals migrate? What traits are important during this migration?

16: Wildebeest Speed

16: Wildebeest Speed

A Wildebeest, also known as a Gnu, can reach speeds of 50 miles per hour. There are many other species that can run fast. Can you name of few others? What do you think gives animals the ability to run fast and how is trait helpful in their survival?

15: Ostrich Talk

15: Ostrich Talk

Observe the ostrich closest to the camera. His neck is slightly enlarged; his wings are slightly raised. Explain what you think this might mean. What do you think the ostrich is communicating with these actions? Be sure to include whose attention you think the ostrich is trying to get. Give details.

14: Aoudad

14: Aoudad

This is a herd of Aoudad. Explain why some animals live in herds. Use the picture for clues to support your ideas. Be sure to give a thesis statement and close your essay with a strong thought.

13: Giraffe & Emu, Compare and Contrast

13: Giraffe & Emu, Compare and Contrast

Look at the two pictures. Think about the different physical properties animals have — Emus and Giraffes in particular. Explain how these two are similar and different. Give at least two similarities and two differences. Use evidence from the pictures to support your statements. Be sure to start your essay with a thesis statement, and end your essay with a concluding sentence.

12: Baby Bongo

12: Baby Bongo

For what reason might this baby Bongo be apart from his mother? Use any evidence from the picture that applies to your idea. Be sure to include a thesis statement and a closing thought. Explain the physical properties that support this baby’s safety as it waits for its mom to return.

11: Hungry Lemur

11: Hungry Lemur

Here is a picture of a Ring-tailed Lemur; it appears to be eating. Their diets consist mainly of fruits and leaves. They look for their food during the day and during the night. During the dry season, they have to adapt to fewer options, and they will even eat dried wood, insects, flowers, and sap. What characteristics do you think are most important for Lemurs to have when they look for food? Think about, too, the mothers that have young to feed. What additional characteristics must they have?

10: Eland, Compare and Contrast

10: Eland, Compare and Contrast

These are two photos of Eland antelope. Examine these photos. One photo is a female and one is a male. What are some differences between the two? Describe the differences you see.

9: Donkey Talk

9: Donkey Talk

Did you know, the "hee-haw" sound Donkeys make is actually called braying? Donkey brays can travel long distances. They also communicate using their body language and movements. What are some reasons Donkeys might need the ability to communicate to each other?

8: Lollygagging Llamas

8: Lollygagging Llamas

Do you know what kind of animal is in this picture? This is a group of Llamas. What do you imagine going on here? What are some reasons they are where they are?

7: Lazy Lemur

7: Lazy Lemur

What do you think this Ring-tailed Lemur is doing? What attitude does the Lemur have in this picture? Have you ever felt the way you think this lemur feels? Explain what you and this Lemur have in common. Explain an event that put you in the same mood you think this lemur.

6: Fighting Blackbuck

6: Fighting Blackbuck

Males of many species fight using their horns or antlers. Reasons for fighting vary. One reason may be to establish dominance within their herd. Dominate males (or the winner of the fight) become the leader of the herd. Use clues from the picture to explain what traits a dominant male most likely possesses to win. Explain why the strongest male, or the winner should lead the herd. Think about what would the lead male should be able to do for his herd.

5: Kangaroo For A Day

5: Kangaroo For A Day

What do you think it would be like to be a Kangaroo for a day? Be sure and give details about your day. What did you do? How did each part of your day make you feel?

4: Watching Ostrich

4: Watching Ostrich

People like to watch animals. Think about times when you have seen animals looking at you. If they could use human words, what do you think they would say? Write an essay explaining your opinion and give examples. You may use the picture to help you develop your opinion.

3: Aoudad

3: Aoudad

There is joke about the why the chicken crossed the road. Give an explanation why this Aoudad might be crossing the road.

2: African Crowned Crane

2: African Crowned Crane

Here is a picture of an African Crowned Crane. Think about all the physical traits that you see: the long thin legs, large wing span, a large beak, and a fancy feather on his head. Explain why you think this animal needs each of these traits to stay alive.

1: Silly Zebra

1: Silly Zebra

Animals can be silly, too. What do you think this Zebra is doing? Why might he act this way? Be sure to give details in your essay!